production

82 Human reallocation

Stories An amused hayseed watched the automated orange juice machine slice and squeeze his orange for him. He was less amused when the cup stuck in the chute and failed to catch the juice. In his old farmer drawl, he exclaimed, “the durn thing even drinks it fer ya.” It was too much automation for him! Let’s leave behind the corny jokes and concentrate on the opening of article 81, an infantile desire to receive every needful thing from the world. One professor told us that the first requirement of a good physicist is to be lazy—our work is always …

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74 Supply Pipe

Values Disclaimer: This is not economics; this is human thought. I am a thoughtful person, and the principles expressed here are my personal tools for understanding my life and surroundings. Economists are probably dismayed by my every sentence, thinking “Why doesn’t this fool apply the established methods of our profession? We worked this out long ago.” Apparently, I am not content with solutions worked out thus far. Working to fulfill the moral goals that I have set, I am expressing my values, not theoretical elegance. Foundation – real wealth, FISH Article 27 identified Humans’ Needs as the Fundamental Ingredients Sustaining …

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37 Lose job – keep house

Let’s continue Tuesday’s discussion around “you lose your job, you lose your house.” Obviously, I was looking for better than that: namely, that everyone keeps an appropriate dwelling regardless of employment vagaries. That is practical stability. Housing swaps occur when the job moves too far away to commute. Otherwise, keep doing what works; stay with the house. When asked how we pay for this, I propose having all of us pay for it. Think “happy family.” After all, we are discussing neighborhoods, and neighbors appropriately help each other. In the Tuesday post, the terms “large scale” and “aggregate” indicate the …

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36 Silo worlds

Individual worlds of our own creation vary according to our perceptions and experiences. Unresolved differences leave our planet inhabited by a large collection of separated silo worlds. For example, the current market system couples individual occupation to individual housing; you lose your job, you lose your house. The virus pandemic is straining that model: when through no human fault people can’t go to work, why should that cause a devastating crash in the housing system, putting property at risk of not being maintained? The previous article called for “brand-new thoughts,” inviting a kinder, gentler world. Today’s shifting socio-economic terrain is …

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